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Tête d'Homme (Man's Head)

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Tête d'Homme (Man's Head)

1931

Joan Miro

Spanish, 1893-1983

Catalan artist Joan Miró moved to Paris in 1920, where he associated with the Surrealist circle of poets and artists. Collage, chance and accident were key techniques favored by the Surrealists and served as an inspiration for Miró. In 1931, he became affiliated with “Abstraction- Création,” a loose association of artists which sought to counter Surrealism and emphasize abstraction over representation. That same year he created the drawing Tête d’homme (Man’s Head), a composition which is highly abstract but retains—
in its title—a link to nature and figural representation.

Gouache, watercolor, brush and black ink and pastel on paper
24 13/16 × 18 1/8 in. (63 × 46cm)
Gift of Gladys and Sam Rubinstein
2014.26.8
Provenance: [Irving Galleries, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1968]; purchased from gallery by Gladys and Sam Rubinstein, Seattle, Washington, 1968
location
Not currently on view

Resources

Exhibition HistorySeattle, Washington, Seattle Art Museum, "Modern in Europe: Featuring Selections from the Collection of Gladys & Sam Rubinstein", November 5, 2004 - April 17, 2005

Seattle, Washington, Seattle Art Museum, Paintings and Drawings of the European Avant-Garde: The Rubinstein Bequest, Apr. 23, 2014 - May 16, 2021 [Tête d'Homme (Man's Head) on view until Nov. 23, 2014].

Seattle Art Museum acknowledges that we are on the traditional homelands of the Duwamish and the customary territories of the Suquamish and Muckleshoot Peoples. As a cultural and educational institution, we honor our ongoing connection to these communities past, present, and future. We also acknowledge the urban Native peoples from many Nations who call Seattle their home.

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