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'Girl-In-A-Swing' Harlequin scent bottle

Photo: Elizbeth Mann

'Girl-In-A-Swing' Harlequin scent bottle

ca. 1755

This work was a gift from the collection of Frances McDougall, an original member of the Seattle Ceramic Society beginning in the mid-1940s.

Wearing a white hat, a black mask and a rose, blue, green yellow and black checkered costume, holding a wine glass in his right hand and a slapstick in his left, his head forming the stopper, and modeled standing beside a yellow barrel-form patchbox painted with floral sprigs above a domed circular base bouquet, (tiny chip on the hat); mounted on his neck with a gold collar and chain, on the base with a gold footrim, and on the barrel and cover with hinged gold rims decorated with a white enamel band inscribed in gold LA PL US BON [sic].

Porcelain
3 5/16 × 1 3/8 × 1 1/2in. (8.4 × 3.5 × 3.8cm)
Gift of Frances McDougall
2014.16.12
Provenance: [Stoner and Evans, NY]; Purchased from gallery by Frances McDougall, October 1946 – her death; by inheritance to Mrs. McDougall’s daughter Celia Kasony; by inheritance to Mrs. McDougall’s grand-daughter Katherine Kasony-Quinn; gift from Ms. Kasony-Quinn to Seattle Art Museum (in her grandmother’s name), June 2014.
Photo: Elizbeth Mann
location
Not currently on view

Resources

Exhibition HistorySeattle, Washington, Seattle Art Museum, 18th Century English Porcelain, cat. number 104, April 19 - May 27, 1956

Seattle, Washington, Seattle Art Museum, The Collectors: Early European Ceramics and Silver, July 29 - October 3, 1982, number 68

Published ReferencesEnglish Ceramic Circle Transactions, Volume 5, Part 3, 1962, "Pottery and Porcelain from Collections of American Members," p. 169 and 170, pl. 163 b (left)

Seattle Art Museum acknowledges that we are on the traditional homelands of the Duwamish and the customary territories of the Suquamish and Muckleshoot Peoples. As a cultural and educational institution, we honor our ongoing connection to these communities past, present, and future. We also acknowledge the urban Native peoples from many Nations who call Seattle their home.

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